Blog

Get Some Soul Nourishment. Visit the European Capital of Culture 2019

If anything should be your 2019 travel resolution, let it be making sure your experiences are also feed your soul.

For this reason, you should make sure you visit the city that was announced the European Capital of Culture of 2019 – Matera, Italy.

Where is Matera?

Matera lies in the region of Basilicata in South Italy. It includes the famous Sassi area (cave dwellings in the mountains). It’s a capital of the province Matera and used to be a capital of Basilicata too. It was abandoned for about forty years, however, thanks to the Italian government reinhabited. It’s beautiful, it’s sunny, it’s historic. What’s there not to like?

What is special about it?

Matera has been inhabited since the Neolithic period, making it one of the oldest inhabited places in the world.  It has been a proud Unesco World Heritage site since 1993 all thanks to the incredible amount of ancient rocks. In fact, to take a look at ancient constructions, you can visit the Park of the Rupestrian Churches where you will find over 150 ancient rock churches.

Matera is incredibly rich in culture. You learn so much about the city’s history by visiting the old water cisterns, museums and churches.

Be there for this special moment!

The opening ceremony for the year is going to take place on the 19th of January. There will be an exciting village festival featuring a bunch of local bands, celebrating the music of Basilicata.

The rest of the events are spread out across six main themes –“Remote future”, “Continuity and Divergences”, “Reflexions and Connections”, “Utopias and dystopias”, “Roots and paths”.

In July, you will be able to attend an electronic music concert in appreciation of the Apollo 11 mission, alongside many cooking workshops, installations, exhibitions and performances.

Find out more about the schedule of all events happening in Matera in 2019 here.

Redeem your Flightgiftcard in a way that’s valuable for you. Book your trip to Matera this year!

Related articles